Racial Equity

Dismantling Anti-Black Racism to Advance Fairer, Healthier and More Inclusive Societies

South Africa | United States

Our final grants to promote racial equity aim to dismantle anti-black racism. Our goal is to ensure that all people in the United States and South Africa—two countries with deep and enduring legacies of racial exclusion and discrimination—have a fair chance at success.

In 2016, Atlantic—in partnership with Columbia University and champions of racial equity—launched the Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity, a program to support the growing movement of those dedicated to disrupting and dismantling anti-black racism in the United States and South Africa.

In the United States, the legacy of slavery and segregation looms large, and racial discrimination is systemic and omnipresent. In South Africa, despite two decades of post-apartheid programs to redistribute land, improve employment equity and stimulate development in black communities, black South Africans face continuing hardship and inequality; and levels of poverty, inadequate education and health disparities are crushingly high.

Our new fellows program seeks to build on significant and growing movements for equality and inclusion in both nations and to offer fresh thinking and to encourage even greater activism so that much more can be achieved. In South Africa and the United States, young and emerging changemakers and thought leaders who are challenging anti-black racism are also using these struggles to take aim at other forms of exclusion that are obstacles to creating more just, inclusive and free societies.

“At a time when issues of race and identity are at the forefront of intense debates in South Africa, the U.S. and around the globe, supporting multi-racial and multi-ethnic leadership to lead us forward could not be more urgent or essential.” - Kavitha Mediratta, Atlantic Philanthropies chief strategy advisor and founding executive director of the Atlantic Fellows for Racial Equity program. Photo: Getty Images

Our final grants build on earlier work in the U.S. and South Africa to challenge inequality and increase opportunities for communities of color.