Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity: Scholarship & Fellowship Programs

Resource type: News

American Academy of Nursing |

The American Academy of Nursing, with support from the John A. Hartford Foundation of New York City and the Atlantic Philanthropies, seeks applicants for the following Scholarship and Fellowship Programs:

The Predoctoral Scholarship program is designed to support 2 years of doctoral work for nurses committed to careers in academic geriatric nursing. The program awards a total of $100,000 ($50,000 per annum) to each selected Predoctoral Scholar candidate.

The Claire M. Fagin Fellowship provides $120,000 for the 2-year fellowship ($60,000 per annum) for advanced research training and mentorship designed to assist doctorally-prepared nurses committed to faculty careers in geriatric nursing.

The Mayday Fund provides an additional $5,000 award to selected scholar and fellow candidates whose research includes the study of pain in the elderly.

Please feel free to contact Patty Franklin at 202-777-1172 if additional information is needed.

The 2009-2011 Cohort has been selected. 2010-2012 information is now available.

The John A. Hartford Foundation’s overall goal is to increase the nation’s capacity to provide effective and affordable care to its rapidly increasing older population. Specifically, the Foundation seeks to enhance the training of physicians, nurses, social workers and other health professionals who care for older adults, and promote innovations in the integration and delivery of services.

The Atlantic Philanthropies are dedicated to bringing about lasting changes in the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people. Atlantic makes grants through its four programme areas – Ageing, Children & Youth, Population Health, and Reconciliation & Human Rights – and through Founding Chairman grants. Programmes funded by Atlantic operate in Australia, Bermuda, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, South Africa, the United States and Viet Nam.

The Mayday Fund is dedicated to alleviating the incidence, degree and consequence of human physical pain.

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